Two people found fatally stabbed on separate NYC subway trains

Two people were fatally stabbed at opposite ends of the A train overnight, and cops are probing whether the terrifying bloodbath is the work of a single attacker.

The first victim, an apparently homeless man, was discovered at 11:20 p.m. Friday at Mott Avenue and Beach 22nd Street Station in Queens, with multiple stab wounds in the neck and torso, according to cops, who said he was declared dead at the scene.

About two hours later, a woman with multiple stab wounds was found at the A train station at West 207 Street and Broadway in Inwood, cops said.

The woman, 44, was taken to New York Presbyterian-Allen Hospital, where she was declared dead, according to authorities.

“Oh my god…She died!” her father told The Post.

“Oh my God! My Jesus, father! Did they catch who did it? She don’t listen and she keeps riding these trains,” said the man, who said his daughter had been living in homeless shelters since the 1990s and had mental health issues.

“The trains are not safe. Anything can happen. …I loved everything about her, but she doesn’t listen,” the distraught dad said.

Cops are probing whether the two A train slayings are connected.
Cops are probing whether the two A train slayings are connected.
Seth Gottfried

Meanwhile, 10 minutes after the first fatal knife attack a 67-year-old man waiting at the A train stop at Fort Washington Avenue and West 181st Street stop was accosted by a crazed attacker.

“I’m going to kill you!” the attacker yelled as he stabbed the victim, who was using a walker, in the knee and hip, police said. The victim was taken to Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center for treatment.

The attack is eerily reminiscent of a Feb. 6 assault on a Brooklyn straphanger, who was stabbed by a knife-wielding man who told him, “You’re going “to die today.”

Shaken commuters at the A train’s Far Rockaway Mott Avenue station called for stepped-up security measures, suggesting increased patrols and metal detectors.

“It’s scary. It’s really scary. I’ve never felt safe on the subway, but I’ve always known I’ve had to take them,” Marissa Augustus, 17, who was on her way to work, told The Post. “I’m scared for my life….There’s always police over here, so I’m just wondering why they weren’t here at that time” (of the fatal stabbing).

Maurice Moore, 33, who was trying to go to the gym, said the subways are not safe at night, adding, “The police should be here more often. When I go home late, there’s no cops here…”Between the hours of 8 in the morning to 5 in the afternoon you see them, but you don’t see them after that.”

The A train was shut down between Far Rockaway and Broad Channel in Queens early Saturday.
The A train was shut down between Far Rockaway and Broad Channel in Queens early Saturday.
Seth Gottfried

Revern Sharp, 45, said the pandemic has meant fewer people — and cops — at the station.

“Every time I get on the train, it’s empty. There’s no police, so that gives them [the criminals] the jurisdiction to [do whatever] they want to do on the train. Smoke, drink, do whatever on the train, because they know no police is coming…“People are jumping the turnstile, nobody pays for it no more. If you got a MetroCard, you stupid…You need more cops on the subway.”

Police at the scene where a woman was critically injured after being stabbed on the A subway train at the 207th Street subway station in New York, NY around 1:45 a.m. on February 13, 2021.
Police at the scene where a woman was critically injured after being stabbed on the A subway train at the 207th Street subway station on Feb. 13, 2021.
Christopher Sadowski

Mayor de Blasio recently waved off NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea’s public concerns of a recent spate of subway attacks, which included a straphanger shoved onto the tracks.

Joseph Giacalone, a retired NYPD sergeant and adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, blamed City Hall for the wave of subway violence.

“All reports indicate that the victims were homeless, another failure by the mayor and those in charge of helping the homeless,” he said. “The transit system is not a homeless shelter and the police department’s role in helping has been diminished to say the least.”

There are no arrests in any of the cases and the investigation is ongoing.

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